Is Winter a Good Time for Indoor Painting?

6
December
Is Winter a Good Time for Indoor Painting?

It’s almost winter here on the Colorado Front Range, bringing cool to freezing temperatures and, in some areas, snow. A lot of us are cooped up indoors on snowy winter days, and you might start noticing how dated your paint colors are. If your home could use a fresh coat of paint, now might seem like a great time for indoor painting. But is it really a good idea to paint your home’s interior during the winter? How does the weather outside affect the paint, inside your house?

Winter on the Front Range

Along the Front Range, the rugged mountain topography produces different types of winters in different areas. Local climates are affected profoundly by elevation, and to a lesser extent, by the way that mountain peaks and valleys affect air flow. There can be significant variations in climate between areas that are quite close to one another geographically. For example, Wolf Creek Pass has annual snowfall of up to 400 feet, while Manassa, just to the east, averages just 40 inches. Lower elevations tend to have less snowfall than higher elevations, and storms moving eastward from the Pacific Ocean lose a great deal of their moisture as rain or snow at the western side of the slopes.

Boulder, along with nearby Louisville and Superior, enjoys some of the mildest low temperatures during the winter. Although snowfall averages about 88 inches per season, the area is shielded from winter precipitation by the orographic lift of the nearby mountains. Snow depth is usually shallow, and snow cover melts quickly due to strong sunlight at the high elevation. For the most part, average winter temperatures stay above 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

Longmont, and the surrounding region, is notable for its 247 days of sunshine per year. With an average annual low of 33.7 degrees Fahrenheit. This region gets only 18 inches of rain per year, and about 32 inches of snowfall.

With an annual low of 29 degrees, the Evergreen area is slightly cooler than Boulder and Longmont. With 83 inches of snowfall each year, it’s also relatively snowy compared to nearby areas.

So Can I Paint My House in the Winter?

Here’s a secret: for professional painters, winter is usually one of the slowest times of year. That means we’re always available for customers. It’s actually a pretty good time to book us for interior painting.

For exterior painting, winter isn’t necessarily the optimal time, because cold temperatures can have a profound effect on the paint itself. Manufacturer recommendations for different kinds of paint can vary, and some paints can be used at temperatures as low as 35 degrees. With that said, cold and snowy winter days can prevent the paint from curing correctly.

But for interior painting, winter is as good a time as any to paint the interior of your home. The sunny but snow-covered landscape reflects a lot of sunlight, providing us with ample natural light while we paint. The big challenge is often ventilation, considering that it’s quite cold outside. You can crack the windows slightly, or use an exhaust fan. It helps to use a water-based paint that’s low in VOCs (volatile organic compounds) this time of year.

If you do decide to get professional interior painting services during the winter, we recommend that you turn up the heat while we’re working. Paint shouldn’t be applied at ambient temperatures under fifty degrees, and for best results, your indoor temperatures should be at least sixty degrees, if not higher. This helps the paint dry faster for better results, and prevents the consistency of the paint from being affected by cool temperatures.

Call Us Any Time for Winter Interior Painting on the Colorado Front Range

Here on the front range, there’s a diverse range of winter conditions in a relatively small geographical area. But whichever type of winter your area has, it can be a great time for interior painting. As long as you keep your temperature at a reasonable level while we paint, you’ll enjoy beautiful results at any time of year.

Collegiate Painters